Cry Monster Cry At The Button Factory – Review

Cry Monster Cry Button Factory Review

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Cry Monster Cry Button Factory Review

Brothers Richie and James Martin, otherwise known as Cry Monster Cry, have a lot to be proud of. Walking out onstage to their sold out Button Factory show, initial outbursts of appreciation come to a complete standstill as soon as they pick up their instruments. This is because everyone knows they’re about to hear something special.

They format their set in such a clever way, initially starting out in a completely stripped back fashion for older tracks, such as, ‘As Long as You’re Left to Carry On’, ‘On Tangled Shores’ and also ‘The Fallen’, which brought me right back to the initial festival setting where I first stumbled across them with curiosity. They continue to have the ability to pull listeners in, and while completely engrossed in their perfect harmonies, you’d be forgiven for forgetting that all that’s in front of you is a minimalist arrangement of two men and their guitar.

The introduction of a full band is a welcome progression to their set. They have a distinctive sound as a two-piece, but the band’s presence is very effective for performing ‘Polaris’ in a live setting and allowing for the inclusion of soft instrumental tracks, such as ‘Old at Heart’, while maintaining the ability to get the crowd going for the more uptempo arrangement of ‘Gelhert’s Grave’. As featured in Around the World in 80 Music Videos as Irish representatives, ‘Starling’ is also a beautiful inclusion, while ‘Postcards’ included the whole room as additional singers, a brilliant moment.

After taking a year out to record their album, Cry Monster Cry have come back with everything getting bigger and better for them and it’s great to hear people showing their appreciation by singing back in their direction. With the inclusion of a completely unique cover of Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Dancing in the Dark’, the banjo also makes an appearance for ‘When the Morning Comes’, completely sealing the deal on their quality as a live act and sheer talent as artists. They deservedly leave the stage to a standing ovation, and quite simply, if you don’t yet have a copy of their Rhythm of Dawn album, you need to get that into your life.

 

Nicole Leggett

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