Irish Band Of The Week – New Valley Wolves

Irish Band Of The Week - New Valley Wolves

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Irish Band Of The Week - New Valley Wolves

This week’s Irish Band of the Week, New Valley Wolves, are full of attitude, which is exactly what you need to cut through the monotony of the dull Monday between now and Easter. These two lads have already established themselves as a force to be reckoned with from their claim that they are ‘here to rescue you from the bombardment of soft rock/indie idiocy that floods your airwaves’ to their gritty, throwback to hard-core rock of days gone by. With a sound bigger than an A-Bomb and energy that borders on psychotic, New Valley Wolves play dirty, blues rock riffs with a sinister edge. On top of this scathing take on current music and their love of pulsating, head-banging rock, it’s safe to say that the duo, comprised of Jonny Lucey and Baz Joyce, are some of the hardest working musicians on the scene at the moment. Just a quick glance at all the promotion and gigging they’ve been doing throughout the country and abroad (Electric Picnic, Hard Working Class Heroes, Whelan’s Ones to Watch, Knockanstockan, Body&Soul, Rory Fest, Sea Sessions, Vantastival and Appelpop (Netherlands), to name but a few) emphasises just how dedicated and passionate these boys are and their love of what they do.

See also: New Valley Wolves – ‘Eyes On Me’

However, there’s not much point in being such a prominent force if you don’t have the musical prowess to support it, right? Well, fear not, New Valley Wolves have a lyrical elegance to them that shines through all the grit and rock. Their song ‘Crooked Sea’ is a beast of a track, relentless, unapologetic, and full of purpose – a track that harks back to rock ‘n’ roll’s glory days. The album, Refusal is Our Weapon, is a lesson in how rock has grown and how it should be. As a duo, their style bears a striking resemblance to British rock pair Royal Blood, the two of them having more musical ability in their pinkie finger than some bands have in their entirety – and that’s something to be both envied and appreciated in equal measure.

 

Elaine McDonald

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