The Strypes at The Academy – Review & Photos

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the-strypes-academy-10The Strypes at The Academy, Dublin – April 11th

Support: The Hot Sprockets

It all started off so well. The gracious effervescent BP Fallon reciting poetry by way of introduction. “I believe in Elvis Presley, I believe in Oscar Wilde, I believe in Come What May… I believe in vinyl records… I believe in Co. Cavan and Josh and Peter and Ross and Evan. I believe in The Strypes.” An intro worthy of “This Is Your Life”, which could easily see these four guys getting the big red book. Except for the fact, as The Specials would say they’re much too young. Too young to vote, too young to drink, too young for credit cards and too young to be out so late.

However, they ain’t too young for rock and roll. The four of them, belting out the tunes rock and blues style to worshipping crowd of faithful fans. Hitting first with “What A Shame”, wasting no time ripping up riffs with their own creation. Lead singer Ross resplendent in tartan, elusive in dark glasses.

Lashing through a considerable set of edgy, fast, swagger and blues, populated with credible covers such as The Ramones “Rockaway Beach” and  Richard Berry’s/The Kingsmen’s “Louie Louie”. Their own concoctions of “Mystery Man”, and “Hometown Girls” had long lasting showtime resonance. Electrified fans bursting at the barrier showed their shock and approval by the time Peter had his shirt torn off mid crowd surfing, Josh ended up letting the punters grope his guitar. Security struggled to get it back before Josh himself had to be rescued. Final drama call came when three “stage invaders” took over the mania with the lads full backing. And all of this whilst they played their sexed up, extended, full fat version of “Louie Louie”.

These kids who’ve dropped out of school have graduated from the BP Fallon University of Rock ‘n’ Roll. You want a show? They’ll give a show like no other. Unique Selling Point: they’ve got the balls, they’ve got the tunes and they’ve got the talent. Anarchy rules.

Review by Ciara Sheahan

Photos by Anamaria Meiu

 

Tudor Marian

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