The Young Folk at Dublin Coffee & Tea Festival – Review

The Young Folk

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The Young Folk

A sunny September Sunday afternoon. Aromas of the finest coffees from around the world waft through the RDS. Handsome Italian baristas charm their way around the venue offering free coffees, secret roasting recipes and serving tips. Exotic tea leaves, complicated coffee contraptions and espresso cups clink and tinkle into conversations on this specialist art of consumption.

As the steam rises on the inside of the Industries Hall, the harmonies rise on the outside as some of Ireland’s best indie rock ‘n’ roll new bands take the stage. Sponsored by Bewley’s, the setting is oversized bean bags, tip top pointed tents, tea chests and a gourmet coffee bar. Families laze around, soaking up the rays whilst The Young Folk swell the air with their unique gently folk flavoured tunes. Opening with the elegant “Grown”, timely, softly paced and breezy. The snoozy audience beginning to awaken to the repetitive chorus and impressive array of instruments. The short set continues with an oldie from 2012, “All Welcome Here”. Impressive sax outro leads into a newbie. “I Have Been Here Before” is taken from their debut album “The Little Battle” released last week. Infectious folksy pared back harmonies, earnest lyrics and infectious guitars fuse for this little charmer. “Bright Eyed Thieves” goes back to the earlier days. This song is a sky swelling melodramatic stretched out work of art. Starting out soft, it soon peaks with added percussion to a full fat jazzed up version. The next gem is “Letters”, with it’s childhood chimes and piano swaying waltzy melodies from “The Little Battle”. Nostalgic imagery, promises and self doubt tell the lyrical story of resolute love. “Way Home” closes this tasting menu from The Young Folk. A faster moving  up tempo tune, a clear favourite amongst the coffee lovers, it seems The Young Folk are a good match for a well roasted americano in the sun.

By Ciara Sheahan

 

Lucy Ivan

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